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LIMITED EDITION PRINT COLLECTION

INPHO SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY are now offering the opportunity for people to buy Limited Edition prints of some of our most iconic images. We are producing twenty prints that reflect not only some great moments but also showcase exceptional photography. They are superbly presented on fine art metallic lustre paper, archival mount board in a hand crafted wooden frame with museum glass. The Mount is 24” by 16”. They all come with a Letter of Authentication with the image number and are limited to just 50 prints per image. All images are signed by the photographer. We hope that people can seize this opportunity to have a small bit of Irish sports history.

Ireland vs England Croke Park 2007

On the 21st November 1920 in Croke Park, British soldiers opened fire during a game of Gaelic Football between Dublin and Tipperary and killed 14 people and wounded another 60. This tragedy became a source of resistance towards the British Occupation of Ireland. As the home of the Gaelic Athletic Association, no British sports teams would be allowed to play there. When the Irish Rugby Football Union redeveloped Lansdowne Road into the Aviva Stadium, they had an arrangement with the GAA to allow the rugby team to play in Croke Park. Inevitably the England rugby team were due to play there and in 2007 it happened. Despite worries it turned out to be a celebration of Irish sport as Ireland beat England 43-13. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Nine All Ireland Medals Henry Shefflin

Without doubt Kilkenny hurler Henry Shefflin is one of the finest hurlers to have ever played the game. He is the only player in the history of Gaelic games to have won ten All-Ireland senior winners' medals on the field of play. This image taken by James Crombie reflects the intensity and desire which were integral to Shefflin’s make up. James was looking for a picture to bring out what Shefflin brought to the game. It is quite easy to get a standard image of hurling but to take one that shows that extra level of personality makes this a very special photograph. Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Munster Heineken Cup Winners 2006

In 2006 the Munster Rugby team, coached by Declan Kidney, finally reached the Holy Grail when they beat Biarritz in Cardiff to win the Heineken Cup for the first time. The day after the match (and subsequent celebrations), as official photographer to Munster Billy Stickland got to take a squad shot. Once the main picture was finished he asked the squad to show a bit of emotion and to celebrate. They were a special team with legends such as Paul O’Connell and Ronan O’Gara. This image was the result and it is very satisfying to have a photograph that conveys something about the camaraderie and spirit of that squad. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Mud and Sweat

This picture was taken at an ordinary club match in Clontarf and shows perfectly that you don’t have to be at a really high end event to get the best pictures. You just have to be focused and aware of what is going on. Sometimes it is more likely you can get a photograph like this as the pitch conditions can be worse than in a professional match. Sometimes it is easy to just switch off but this image by Morgan Treacy shows great photographic skill and all illustrates the toughness and resilience of the amateur game. Picture by MORGAN TREACY

Drinking from the Sam Maguire

Back in 1992 Donegal won their first All Ireland Football Final when they beat Dublin. Afterwards Inpho photographer Billy Stickland spent a couple of days in Donegal with their captain Anthony Molloy as he brought the Sam Maguire Trophy around Donegal to celebrate. He went with him to a lot of pubs and it became obvious how the centre of attraction was the mythical cup itself. Far away from the excitement of Croke Park this picture shows a different angle on the history of the Sam Maguire trophy and rather than the fans dominating the scene, the actual trophy is centre stage. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Triathlon Swim

At Inpho our photographers are always looking for shape and form to give an image a special lift. People assume sometimes that there is a large element of luck. The trick is to minimise the luck factor. When you make good decisions about your angles and choose the right equipment to use, and add in the knowledge of the sport, then the luck is greatly reduced and you are creating something special. Our photographer Morgan Treacy knows this and used all of these factors and his experience to get a brilliant picture. Picture by MORGAN TREACY

Triathlon Moment

There are reflective moments in sport when athletes are completely absorbed in themselves. It might be just before a game or a pause in play. This picture by Ryan Byrne was taken as triathletes were preparing to get ready for the swimming section of a race. This a tense and nervous time brilliantly captured. It says something about the mental preparation in sport and the need to focus. This is accentuated by the camera angle that Ryan chose and his use of the sky to give it a more dynamic atmosphere. Picture by RYAN BYRNE

Haka Tribute to Anthony Foley vs All Blacks Chicago 2016

Munster assistant coach and former Ireland number 8 Anthony Foley died suddenly just before a match against Racing 92 in October of 2016. The following month Ireland were playing the New Zealand All Blacks in Chicago and the team thought up the idea of challenging the Haka by doing a figure of eight to symbolise the jersey worn by Foley during his career. It was an emotional moment and set the perfect tone for the match. All of the Munster players were at the front of the figure eight. It was an amazing challenge laid down to the All Blacks' Haka. Ireland went on to beat the All Blacks for the first time ever, winning 40-29. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

After the Match British and Irish Lions 2017

This picture was taken just after the British and Irish Lions had narrowly beaten NZ Provincial Barbarians in Whangarei in New Zealand. It shows how tough rugby is as a game. Inpho Sports Photography have always put trust with the subject as a key part of getting the right image. As official photographer for the British and Irish Lions Dan Sheridan has built up this mutual trust over three tours, in 2009, 2013 and 2017. It has reached the point where the players do not even notice him there as a photographer and so when it comes to a sensitive moment, as in this case, he makes it look effortless. These moments do not happen if you do not have that relationship. Picture by DAN SHERIDAN

Under Pressure

We all know that the scrum in rugby is a tough place to be, especially in the front row. For a photographer during a match it is very difficult to get the picture angle right because of how the scrum is positioned. Inpho photographer Dan Sheridan knows rugby really well and he had to know when he was likely to get the best shot. It’s very easy to just photograph the scrum in a normal pose but when the pressure comes on it is very difficult to get your timing right. In this image you can almost feel that you are inside the scrum. Picture by DAN SHERIDAN

The Racing Punter

Sometimes at race meetings there is little to do between the actual races themselves. However if the photographer has a good imagination there are a lot of pictures waiting to be taken and this one by our photographer James Crombie illustrates this point perfectly. But you have to go looking for it. Sometimes by just having a good look at the crowd you will see something that works. He spotted this punter looking through binoculars. Using a telephoto lens James was able to isolate him from the background with a really good tight composition. It is an image which so definitely reflects horse racing Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Over the Fence

When an Inpho photographer goes to a race meeting it is always in the back of their mind to take a picture from underneath a fence as the horses jump over. This is not as easy as it may seem and takes planning. Firstly Morgan Tracey had to set up a remote camera between the races to get the right angle and to make sure that the lens and camera were perfect and not going to interfere in any way with the race. The exposure is tricky because of the changing light and the background is vital. The final unknown is if the horse will jump over to give a great shape to the picture. This image had the best possible outcome. Picture by MORGAN TREACY

Dublin Five in a Row

The Dublin gaelic football team earned immortality in 2019 by becoming the first team to win five All Ireland Football Finals in a row between 2015 and 2019. They also won it in 2013. This is all the more remarkable in that they failed to appear in a final between 1995 and 2011. This was an extraordinary achievement for the team under manager Jim Gavin who helped to bring the game of Gaelic Football to a new level. Remarkably Dublin goalkeeper Stephen Cluxton captained them in all five wins. This image combines Cluxton lifting the cup with the number 5 balloon in the background so it lets you know how dominant Dublin have been in recent years. Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Downpour in Donnybrook

Sometimes weather conditions make a mockery of a sporting occasion. Photographers look on it as an opportunity as it can turn an ordinary match into a strong memory. It is not easy as you are battling the elements trying to keep yourself and your cameras dry. You run the risk of damaging your equipment beyond repair without getting anything special from your efforts. Not so in this case. Inpho photographer Dan Sheridan has been very close to the Ireland Women’s rugby team having over the years covered their wins over New Zealand in the World Cup and their Grand Slam success in the 6 Nations. This image adds to the story. Picture by DAN SHERIDAN

The Hurler and the Moon

James Crombie had been talking about this picture for years. He had wanted to do a hurler silhouetted by the moon. It looks simple but it was very complicated to get both the hurler and the moon in sync. He had to have a full moon and a clear night. He had to work out the angle and trajectory of the moon in relation to where the hurler stood. It was shot on a strong 600mm telephoto lens to give it the right effect and he had to communicate by mobile phone to get it right. He only had a few minutes to take it. A perfect example of good preparation paying off. Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Packie Bonner Save Italia 1990

In 1990 the Republic of Ireland, coached by Jack Charlton, made it through to the quarter-finals of the Soccer World Cup in Italy. The stadium in Genoa was packed with Irish fans for this match against Romania. The game came down to a penalty shootout. Inpho photographer Billy Stickland was one of only two photographers who managed to position himself up the touchline at the perfect angle for Packie Bonner’s save. Focusing on the keeper and hoping he would not only save it but dive in his direction, it worked perfectly. This has become one of the iconic images of Irish sport from a special day when the whole country watched on. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Jacob Stockdale Try vs All Blacks 2018

There is a position that we sometimes use in the Aviva stadium which means putting a photographer up where the floodlights are. It’s quite an effort to get there and you have to be very comfortable with heights. It’s an unusual position and for most matches there is very little to be taken apart from the different angle looking down on the pitch. However sometimes you get something really special. Inpho photographer Tommy Dickson skilfully shot the whole sequence as Jacob Stockdale chipped the ball, chased and picked it up again to score and his angle was perfect. Ireland beat the All Blacks for the first time in Ireland and this image is central to what happened on that day. Picture by TOMMY DICKSON

Letting his Hair Down

There is always a certain fascination with athletes having really long hair in a contact sport like rugby. In this picture, captured by Inpho photographer Laszlo Geczo, Leinster’s Joe Tomane was always going to be of particular interest. Laszlo had seen the possibilities of getting a really good picture of his distinctive hair but he had to wait until a quiet moment in the game to get it. You might expect to get an image of him running with the ball but this picture is more surprising and interesting than that with just one eye peering through during a pause in play. Picture by LASZLO GECZO

Clash of the Ash

People are always talking about the Clash of the Ash in hurling. As a photographer hurling is an amazing game with great action possibilities. It is not that difficult to get a good action picture but it is very hard to get something exceptional. Our photographer Ryan Byrne took this, not at a high level inter-county match, but in an intense Leinster Club Senior Championship match between Kilmacud Crokes and Oulart-the-Ballagh. It shows hurling as a very competitive and skilful sport. The pouring rain adds to the atmosphere to make this picture special. Picture by RYAN BYRNE

Sonia O’Sullivan Silver Medal Sydney 2000

When you photograph a brilliant athlete like Sonia O’Sullivan during the height of her achievements in the 1990’s, you understand the highs and lows of top level sport. This is particularly true of the Olympics where athletes have to peak at exactly the right time to win a medal. Without doubt Sonia was world class and in 1996 she was nailed on to win a gold medal in Atlanta. Our photographer Billy Stickland was there and remembers clearly how he waited from early in the day in a prime position to get the image of her winning a gold medal. It was not to be. Four years later in Sydney she finally got what she deserved and won the silver medal and this moment of her crossing the line shows what it meant to her. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

LIMITED EDITION PRINT COLLECTION

INPHO SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY are now offering the opportunity for people to buy Limited Edition prints of some of our most iconic images. We are producing twenty prints that reflect not only some great moments but also showcase exceptional photography. They are superbly presented on fine art metallic lustre paper, archival mount board in a hand crafted wooden frame with museum glass. The Mount is 24” by 16”. They all come with a Letter of Authentication with the image number and are limited to just 50 prints per image. All images are signed by the photographer. We hope that people can seize this opportunity to have a small bit of Irish sports history.

Ireland vs England Croke Park 2007

On the 21st November 1920 in Croke Park, British soldiers opened fire during a game of Gaelic Football between Dublin and Tipperary and killed 14 people and wounded another 60. This tragedy became a source of resistance towards the British Occupation of Ireland. As the home of the Gaelic Athletic Association, no British sports teams would be allowed to play there. When the Irish Rugby Football Union redeveloped Lansdowne Road into the Aviva Stadium, they had an arrangement with the GAA to allow the rugby team to play in Croke Park. Inevitably the England rugby team were due to play there and in 2007 it happened. Despite worries it turned out to be a celebration of Irish sport as Ireland beat England 43-13. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Nine All Ireland Medals Henry Shefflin

Without doubt Kilkenny hurler Henry Shefflin is one of the finest hurlers to have ever played the game. He is the only player in the history of Gaelic games to have won ten All-Ireland senior winners' medals on the field of play. This image taken by James Crombie reflects the intensity and desire which were integral to Shefflin’s make up. James was looking for a picture to bring out what Shefflin brought to the game. It is quite easy to get a standard image of hurling but to take one that shows that extra level of personality makes this a very special photograph. Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Munster Heineken Cup Winners 2006

In 2006 the Munster Rugby team, coached by Declan Kidney, finally reached the Holy Grail when they beat Biarritz in Cardiff to win the Heineken Cup for the first time. The day after the match (and subsequent celebrations), as official photographer to Munster Billy Stickland got to take a squad shot. Once the main picture was finished he asked the squad to show a bit of emotion and to celebrate. They were a special team with legends such as Paul O’Connell and Ronan O’Gara. This image was the result and it is very satisfying to have a photograph that conveys something about the camaraderie and spirit of that squad. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Mud and Sweat

This picture was taken at an ordinary club match in Clontarf and shows perfectly that you don’t have to be at a really high end event to get the best pictures. You just have to be focused and aware of what is going on. Sometimes it is more likely you can get a photograph like this as the pitch conditions can be worse than in a professional match. Sometimes it is easy to just switch off but this image by Morgan Treacy shows great photographic skill and all illustrates the toughness and resilience of the amateur game. Picture by MORGAN TREACY

Drinking from the Sam Maguire

Back in 1992 Donegal won their first All Ireland Football Final when they beat Dublin. Afterwards Inpho photographer Billy Stickland spent a couple of days in Donegal with their captain Anthony Molloy as he brought the Sam Maguire Trophy around Donegal to celebrate. He went with him to a lot of pubs and it became obvious how the centre of attraction was the mythical cup itself. Far away from the excitement of Croke Park this picture shows a different angle on the history of the Sam Maguire trophy and rather than the fans dominating the scene, the actual trophy is centre stage. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Triathlon Swim

At Inpho our photographers are always looking for shape and form to give an image a special lift. People assume sometimes that there is a large element of luck. The trick is to minimise the luck factor. When you make good decisions about your angles and choose the right equipment to use, and add in the knowledge of the sport, then the luck is greatly reduced and you are creating something special. Our photographer Morgan Treacy knows this and used all of these factors and his experience to get a brilliant picture. Picture by MORGAN TREACY

Triathlon Moment

There are reflective moments in sport when athletes are completely absorbed in themselves. It might be just before a game or a pause in play. This picture by Ryan Byrne was taken as triathletes were preparing to get ready for the swimming section of a race. This a tense and nervous time brilliantly captured. It says something about the mental preparation in sport and the need to focus. This is accentuated by the camera angle that Ryan chose and his use of the sky to give it a more dynamic atmosphere. Picture by RYAN BYRNE

Haka Tribute to Anthony Foley vs All Blacks Chicago 2016

Munster assistant coach and former Ireland number 8 Anthony Foley died suddenly just before a match against Racing 92 in October of 2016. The following month Ireland were playing the New Zealand All Blacks in Chicago and the team thought up the idea of challenging the Haka by doing a figure of eight to symbolise the jersey worn by Foley during his career. It was an emotional moment and set the perfect tone for the match. All of the Munster players were at the front of the figure eight. It was an amazing challenge laid down to the All Blacks' Haka. Ireland went on to beat the All Blacks for the first time ever, winning 40-29. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

After the Match British and Irish Lions 2017

This picture was taken just after the British and Irish Lions had narrowly beaten NZ Provincial Barbarians in Whangarei in New Zealand. It shows how tough rugby is as a game. Inpho Sports Photography have always put trust with the subject as a key part of getting the right image. As official photographer for the British and Irish Lions Dan Sheridan has built up this mutual trust over three tours, in 2009, 2013 and 2017. It has reached the point where the players do not even notice him there as a photographer and so when it comes to a sensitive moment, as in this case, he makes it look effortless. These moments do not happen if you do not have that relationship. Picture by DAN SHERIDAN

Under Pressure

We all know that the scrum in rugby is a tough place to be, especially in the front row. For a photographer during a match it is very difficult to get the picture angle right because of how the scrum is positioned. Inpho photographer Dan Sheridan knows rugby really well and he had to know when he was likely to get the best shot. It’s very easy to just photograph the scrum in a normal pose but when the pressure comes on it is very difficult to get your timing right. In this image you can almost feel that you are inside the scrum. Picture by DAN SHERIDAN

The Racing Punter

Sometimes at race meetings there is little to do between the actual races themselves. However if the photographer has a good imagination there are a lot of pictures waiting to be taken and this one by our photographer James Crombie illustrates this point perfectly. But you have to go looking for it. Sometimes by just having a good look at the crowd you will see something that works. He spotted this punter looking through binoculars. Using a telephoto lens James was able to isolate him from the background with a really good tight composition. It is an image which so definitely reflects horse racing Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Over the Fence

When an Inpho photographer goes to a race meeting it is always in the back of their mind to take a picture from underneath a fence as the horses jump over. This is not as easy as it may seem and takes planning. Firstly Morgan Tracey had to set up a remote camera between the races to get the right angle and to make sure that the lens and camera were perfect and not going to interfere in any way with the race. The exposure is tricky because of the changing light and the background is vital. The final unknown is if the horse will jump over to give a great shape to the picture. This image had the best possible outcome. Picture by MORGAN TREACY

Dublin Five in a Row

The Dublin gaelic football team earned immortality in 2019 by becoming the first team to win five All Ireland Football Finals in a row between 2015 and 2019. They also won it in 2013. This is all the more remarkable in that they failed to appear in a final between 1995 and 2011. This was an extraordinary achievement for the team under manager Jim Gavin who helped to bring the game of Gaelic Football to a new level. Remarkably Dublin goalkeeper Stephen Cluxton captained them in all five wins. This image combines Cluxton lifting the cup with the number 5 balloon in the background so it lets you know how dominant Dublin have been in recent years. Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Downpour in Donnybrook

Sometimes weather conditions make a mockery of a sporting occasion. Photographers look on it as an opportunity as it can turn an ordinary match into a strong memory. It is not easy as you are battling the elements trying to keep yourself and your cameras dry. You run the risk of damaging your equipment beyond repair without getting anything special from your efforts. Not so in this case. Inpho photographer Dan Sheridan has been very close to the Ireland Women’s rugby team having over the years covered their wins over New Zealand in the World Cup and their Grand Slam success in the 6 Nations. This image adds to the story. Picture by DAN SHERIDAN

The Hurler and the Moon

James Crombie had been talking about this picture for years. He had wanted to do a hurler silhouetted by the moon. It looks simple but it was very complicated to get both the hurler and the moon in sync. He had to have a full moon and a clear night. He had to work out the angle and trajectory of the moon in relation to where the hurler stood. It was shot on a strong 600mm telephoto lens to give it the right effect and he had to communicate by mobile phone to get it right. He only had a few minutes to take it. A perfect example of good preparation paying off. Picture by JAMES CROMBIE

Packie Bonner Save Italia 1990

In 1990 the Republic of Ireland, coached by Jack Charlton, made it through to the quarter-finals of the Soccer World Cup in Italy. The stadium in Genoa was packed with Irish fans for this match against Romania. The game came down to a penalty shootout. Inpho photographer Billy Stickland was one of only two photographers who managed to position himself up the touchline at the perfect angle for Packie Bonner’s save. Focusing on the keeper and hoping he would not only save it but dive in his direction, it worked perfectly. This has become one of the iconic images of Irish sport from a special day when the whole country watched on. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND

Jacob Stockdale Try vs All Blacks 2018

There is a position that we sometimes use in the Aviva stadium which means putting a photographer up where the floodlights are. It’s quite an effort to get there and you have to be very comfortable with heights. It’s an unusual position and for most matches there is very little to be taken apart from the different angle looking down on the pitch. However sometimes you get something really special. Inpho photographer Tommy Dickson skilfully shot the whole sequence as Jacob Stockdale chipped the ball, chased and picked it up again to score and his angle was perfect. Ireland beat the All Blacks for the first time in Ireland and this image is central to what happened on that day. Picture by TOMMY DICKSON

Letting his Hair Down

There is always a certain fascination with athletes having really long hair in a contact sport like rugby. In this picture, captured by Inpho photographer Laszlo Geczo, Leinster’s Joe Tomane was always going to be of particular interest. Laszlo had seen the possibilities of getting a really good picture of his distinctive hair but he had to wait until a quiet moment in the game to get it. You might expect to get an image of him running with the ball but this picture is more surprising and interesting than that with just one eye peering through during a pause in play. Picture by LASZLO GECZO

Clash of the Ash

People are always talking about the Clash of the Ash in hurling. As a photographer hurling is an amazing game with great action possibilities. It is not that difficult to get a good action picture but it is very hard to get something exceptional. Our photographer Ryan Byrne took this, not at a high level inter-county match, but in an intense Leinster Club Senior Championship match between Kilmacud Crokes and Oulart-the-Ballagh. It shows hurling as a very competitive and skilful sport. The pouring rain adds to the atmosphere to make this picture special. Picture by RYAN BYRNE

Sonia O’Sullivan Silver Medal Sydney 2000

When you photograph a brilliant athlete like Sonia O’Sullivan during the height of her achievements in the 1990’s, you understand the highs and lows of top level sport. This is particularly true of the Olympics where athletes have to peak at exactly the right time to win a medal. Without doubt Sonia was world class and in 1996 she was nailed on to win a gold medal in Atlanta. Our photographer Billy Stickland was there and remembers clearly how he waited from early in the day in a prime position to get the image of her winning a gold medal. It was not to be. Four years later in Sydney she finally got what she deserved and won the silver medal and this moment of her crossing the line shows what it meant to her. Picture by BILLY STICKLAND